Thursday, October 29, 2015

Study: The use of hearing aids reduces cognitive decline

Hearing loss accelerates cognitive decline in elderly adults, but the use of hearing aids counters this acceleration. A new scientific longitudinal study shows that those who use hearing aids have about the same cognitive level as those with no hearing loss.

Self-reported hearing loss is associated with accelerated cognitive decline in elderly adults, according to an extensive 25 year long scientific French study. The study also documents that the use of hearing aids almost eliminates this cognitive decline.

The study documents that self-reported hearing loss is independently associated with accelerated cognitive decline in elderly adults. However, the opposite statistical trend is observed in participants who used hearing aids. Cognitive decline of those in the study who used hearing aids was not significantly different from the control group (those who reported no hearing loss).  Elderly hearing aid users had similar rates of cognitive decline as those with no hearing impairment.

Improving hearing ability helps

The study does not document that hearing loss has a direct effect on cognitive decline, but that the mental and social consequences of a hearing loss probably mediate the relation. Therefore, improving hearing ability by using hearing aids or cochlear implants reduces the negative mental effects of a hearing loss and increases the ability to participate in cognitively stimulating activities such as social activities, and thereby slows cognitive decline.

Facts about the study

PAQUID is an extensive French study among 3,670 randomly selected individuals aged 65 and older. The study began in 1989-1990 and the participants have been evaluated regularly for 25 years. The study has been led by Professor Hélène Amieva, Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, in France.
In the study, the participants made self reported statements about their hearing loss. Cognitive decline was measured by using a so-called Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The strength of the study is the very long period in which people have been followed and measured and the number of participants.The study has been published in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

“At Hear-it we are profoundly grateful to Professor Hélène Amieva  for having documented, what we have known for decades, but not been able to prove scientifically: That hearing aids help the hard of hearing stay cognitively and mentally fit,” says Secretary General Kim Ruberg, Hear-it AISBL.
Hear-it AISBL is the world’s largest information resource for all issues related to hearing loss, and runs the leading website on hearing loss: www.hear-it.org 

“We know from many other scientific surveys that the use of professional hearing solutions helps hard of hearing people live better lives, participate in social activities, keep a job and in general gives them  a higher quality of life. All this helps the hard of hearing to better health, better social functions and therefore better mental health. Now Professor Hélène Amieva has documented that untreated hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline and that those who use hearing aids have about the same cognitive level as those with no hearing loss,” says Kim Ruberg.

Find out more about Professor Hélène Amieva’s research, the consequences of hearing loss and the benefits of using hearing aids by visiting the world’s largest hearing information resource at www.hear-it.org.


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For further information, contact Hear-It Secretary General, Kim Ruberg, +45 40 300 500 
e-mail: kim@ruberg.dk